Criminal Law

thumb printCRIMINAL LAW
This course examines the purpose, effectiveness and methodology of the regulation of human conduct by the infliction or threat of infliction of criminal sanctions. The definitional elements of certain crimes, principles of responsibility, rules of justification and accessory liability are covered.

CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
This course will examine constitutional aspects of the federal criminal justice system. Primary focal points include the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. The course concerns itself not just with case law but with the context in which it arises and its consequences.


 

ADVANCED CRIMINAL PROCEDURE - "BAIL TO JAIL"
This course addresses criminal process subsequent to arrest, essentially picking up from where our course in Criminal Procedure leaves off. The course focuses on the law governing the initial appearance (right to counsel, right to bail), formal charging decisions, grand jury process, right to speedy trial, discovery, pleas and plea bargains, jury selection and trial, sentencing, double jeopardy, appeals and collateral attacks.

ADVANCED TRIAL ADOCACY & LITIGATION SKILLS
This course will be evenly divided between the study of trial advocacy and a workshop in litigation and trial techniques. The course will study the proven effective tactics and strategies from pre-trial investigation to preserving the record. Particular areas of study will include developing persuasive arguments, trial strategies and tactics, advanced evidentiary issues, preparation of expert witnesses, effective cross-examination and jury selection. A substantial component of the course will consist of motion practice techniques and deposition strategies. The focus of the course will be to teach both the art and science of trial advocacy and litigation, with an emphasis on building on basic Evidence and Trial Advocacy as well as other litigation-related courses. Course work will cover both civil and criminal cases ranging from negligence and contract cases to complex litigation and class actions, as well as misdemeanors to capital cases, in studying criminal practice. This course will prepare the student for a practice in litigation with an emphasis on the art of trying a civil or criminal case from inception on to conclusion.

handcuffs


CRIMES OF THE CENTURY
This course provides the law student with a historical review of some of the most highly profiled criminal defendants, and significant and celebrated cases in American legal history. The student learns how the criminal justice landscape has been defined, altered, re-shaped, and re-defined again, based upon the public focus and attention to the issues raised by the crimes and trials they engendered. It is by studying the manner in which famous trials have been conducted that we learn how society regards itself and judges what it deems important about the ultimate methodology of dispute resolution. In addition, the law student will learn how the rights of the criminally accused have been created and expanded based upon society’s concept of justice and due process and continues to be defined in an ever evolving society.

DIVERSITY, GENDER, AND PUBLIC POLICY
This course will explore how genotypic differences, known as race, and gender issues are addressed in American law and public policy. Students will examine the impact of cases and legislation (Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Title IX and related materials) as the context to discuss current and future policies regarding existing disparities for minorities and women in education, housing, employment, and the criminal justice system. The course will also expand the students’ abilities to analyze the relative merits and demerits of strategies used to influence policymakers in the protection and furtherance of the rights of women and minorities.

FLORIDA PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE
The subject matter of the course is at the intersection of the law of evidence, trial practice and sciences of various types, including both the physical sciences and social sciences. The context of examination of forensic investigation and the use of forensic evidence in the law covers both civil and criminal contexts, with a heavier emphasis on the latter. The method of instruction will include the case law method, as well as, supplementary textual reading and commentary. If time permits, students may be introduced to online databases such as Index Medicus and certain digital investigative tools used in computer forensics. The range of areas covered in this course is expected to include, introduction to crime scene investigation and preservation of evidence, personal identification from DNA and other genetic markers, body fluids, fingerprints, bone structures, serological and toxicological examinations, dental records etc., digital evidence including computer forensics, examination of trace evidence from firearms, tool marks, fibers, hair, cloth etc. In addition, the course may cover the use of forensic methods in linguistics, accounting, engineering, anthropology and in questioned document analysis. Topics may added or deleted according to time constraints

FLORIDA PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE
This course examines rules governing state criminal and civil practice and the state judicial process. It is particularly recommended for persons planning to practice in Florida.

FORENSIC EVIDENCEmagnifying glass
The subject matter of the course is at the intersection of the law of evidence, trial practice and sciences of various types, including both the physical sciences and social sciences. The context of examination of forensic investigation and the use of forensic evidence in the law covers both civil and criminal contexts, with a heavier emphasis on the latter. The method of instruction will include the case law method, as well as, supplementary textual reading and commentary. If time permits, students may be introduced to online databases such as Index Medicus and certain digital investigative tools used in computer forensics. The range of areas covered in this course is expected to include, introduction to crime scene investigation and preservation of evidence, personal identification from DNA and other genetic markers, body fluids, fingerprints, bone structures, serological and toxicological examinations, dental records etc., digital evidence including computer forensics, examination of trace evidence from firearms, tool marks, fibers, hair, cloth etc. In addition, the course may cover the use of forensic methods in linguistics, accounting, engineering, anthropology and in questioned document analysis. Topics may added or deleted according to time constraints.

GEORGIA PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE
This course introduces the student to the applicable decisional and statutory law of civil procedure and criminal procedure in the State of Georgia. Students examine Jurisdiction, Venue, Service of Process, Pleadings and Motions, Parties, Discovery, Trials, Judgment, and Remedies specific to Georgia Civil and Criminal Procedure.

TRIAL PRACTICE LECTURE AND WORKSHOP
A study of trial methodology, including jury voir dire, opening statements, introduction of evidence through direct and cross examination testimony and exhibits, objections and closing arguments. WORKSHOP: Small group workshops designed to expose students to the litigation practice through simulated civil and criminal trial problems. Students will be required to participate in two mock trial competitions in which they will try both sides of a simulated case. Simultaneous registration in the Trial Practice Lecture is required. Emphasis on demonstration of techniques.